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Social Stability Brave New World Essay

The Absence of Social Conflict Social Stability in Brave New World

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The Absence of Social Conflict Social Stability in Brave New World

In Brave New World, Aldous Huxley introduces the dystopia of a society created on the principle of social stability at all costs. Huxley wrote this book in 1932 hoping to warn future generations of what he feared might happen if society did not do something to stop the inevitable. The leaders of our society today hope for and work towards social stability without taking away primitive rights. Social stability can only be achieved by a society whose beliefs in social and ethical issues are never challenged. So even though modern society hopes for social stability, it is not a practical aspiration because it is obvious that some of the social and ethical…show more content…

The people in the Brave New World society are divided into five castes. The highest most intelligent caste is the Alphas; they are the ones that make the rules and regulations for all other lower castes to follow. Betas, Gammas, Deltas, and Epsilons follow in order as well as intelligence, level of control, and social stature. Neo-Pavlovian conditioning ensures the order of the castes. For a society to be socially stable every person in the society must feel like they belong. The caste system in Brave New World ensures that every person in the society has a function that they feel is essential to the success of the society as a whole. Since jobs are designed for each caste by the social skills they exhibit and their intelligence level, it makes it possible for very member of the society to do a job specially designed for their level of ability. Gammas and Deltas carry out menial tasks such as operating an elevator, or being a gopher. Alphas are designated jobs such as the manager of a company or a doctor. The caste-system affects the individual by making them feel needed and therefore avoiding social conflicts having to do with an individual feeling like they are left out of society.

Hypnopedia is the process of embedding social ideologies into the minds of children while they are sleeping by repeating them over and over again. At the beginning, leaders of the Brave New World society tried to teach

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Freedom Is The Cost Of Stability In Brave New World


     David Grayson once said that "Commandment Number One of any truly civilized society is this: Let people be different". Difference, or individuality, however, may not be possible under a dictatorial government. Aldous Huxley's satirical novel Brave New World shows that a government-controlled society often places restraints upon its citizens, which results in a loss of social and mental freedom. These methods of limiting human behavior are carried out by the conditioning of the citizens, the categorical division of society, and the censorship of art and religion.

Conditioning the citizens to like what they have and reject what they do not have is an authoritative government's ideal way of maximizing efficiency. The citizens will consume what they are told to, there will be no brawls or disagreements and the state will retain high profits from the earnings. People can be conditioned chemically and physically prior to birth and psychologically afterwards.

The novel, Brave New World, takes place in the future, 632 A. F. (After Ford), where biological engineering reaches new heights. Babies are no longer born viviparously, they are now decanted in bottles passed through a 2136 metre assembly line. Pre-natal conditioning of embryos is an effective way of limiting human behaviour. Chemical additives can be used to control the population not only in Huxley's future society, but also in the real world today. This method of control can easily be exercised within a government-controlled society to limit population growth and to control the flaws in future citizens. In today's world, there are chemical drugs, which can help a pregnant mother conceive more easily or undergo an abortion. In the new world, since there is no need to make every female fertile, only "as many as thirty per cent of the female embryos ... develop normally. The others get a dose of male sex-hormone ... Result: they are decanted as freemartins..." (Huxley, 10). Freemartins are sterile females who sometimes grow beards. Physical conditioning can also be used to prepare the unborn embryo for its predestined future. The future rocket-plane engineers receive physical conditioning where a "special mechanism kept their containers in constant rotation ... To improve their sense of balance" (Huxley, 14). The conditioning is Huxley's message to the world "that you could dominate people by social, educational and pharmaceutical methods" (Bedford, 249). The babies can be preset on a course of life before they even take their first breaths, taking away their freedom to choose their future destinies.

Psychological conditioning of the citizens continues after birth. The mind is altered to accept the moral education of the government. Two processes the new world uses to control human judgement are the Neo-Pavlovian process and hypnopaedia. The Neo-Pavlovian process is named after Ivan Pavlov, a Twentieth Century Russian scientist who experimented with conditioned reflexes...

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Freedom Never Known vs. Freedom Never Earned: Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

2062 words - 8 pages What is freedom? According to The American Heritage Dictionary, freedom is referred to as “the power to determine action without restraint.” In modern day society, freedom is not thought about; it is taken advantage of and abused. Now, switching one’s perspective to that of a futuristic time period, what if one never experienced freedom, never tasted the sweet pleasure to decide what one wants to do for one’s self? In Aldous Huxley’s Brave New...

Brave New World: How science and technology is used to enslave humanity. An essay into the destructive nature of technology in Brave New World.

991 words - 4 pages Huxley's "Brave New World" is a novel that explores the way in which science can enslave humanity and take away individual freedom. The discourses operating in the text effectively construct social criticism and position the reader to consider the social commentary characterized in society. A discourse of class is represented in the novel in order to consider a world were people's destinies are predetermined. Politics is a dominant discourse...

"Brave New World" by Aldous Huxley - In many ways, John's presence in the "Brave New World" is very antagonistic.

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Brave New World: Argumentative Paragraph The people of Brave New

539 words - 2 pages Brave New World: Argumentative Paragraph The people of Brave New World are not aware of the truth, because most of the time they are on the drug soma. At a young age they are conditioned to think what the society wants them to think, resulting in a false "utopia". This is the one topic which I feel encompasses many of the major themes in this novel. There are many situations where the author,

The Delusion of Happiness in Brave New World and Canada

1720 words - 7 pages Abraham Lincoln once said, “Folks are usually about as happy as they make their minds up to be.” Thus, implying happiness can be determined by ones mindset. However, Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World creates a vision of a utopian society that achieves happiness by altering the mindset of its populace to believe they are happy. In a society depicting such a strange ideology of the future, people are no longer as happy as they make their minds up to...

The Role of Technology in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World

736 words - 3 pages Technology is a huge factor in the development of societies and cultures. In Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, factors like the tough control over reproduction through technological and medical intervention, and the use of soma by all of the people in the society of the “New World” influence the development of their society. The influence of technology, displays the central theme of the book that technology can shape any society. Technological...

The Brave New World

1081 words - 4 pages In the beginning of "Brave New World", the Director of Hatcheries and Conditioning (DHC) leads a group of students through the "Central London Hatchery and Conditioning Centre" to give them an idea of the society and how it is kept stable.The World State was created after the Nine Years War. Its motto is "Community, Identity, Stability". Ford, as the father of mass production, replaces God, and so the introduction of his first T-Model...

The Brave New World

1511 words - 6 pages Literature – as any bookworm will say – is not simply the art of writing. Literature is the Rembrandt of storytelling, the Einstein of language and the Clint Eastwood of action. Literature is not simply a story: literature is a great story. One of the most potent traits of great literature is applicability to the life of the reader. This quality is what sets Brave New World¬ by Aldus Huxley apart from many others: applicability to human society...

Presentation of satire in Brave New World

804 words - 3 pages Analyse the passage (John the Savage in the hospital); discern presentation of satire and how it is wrought. In Brave New World Huxley is targeting consumer, materialistic attitudes that existed in his time (and still do today) and extrapolating, then projecting them into the world that is the World State, to serve as a warning to society of the consequences of these attitudes. The passage in question is from Chapter XIV of Huxley’s Brave New...

Brave New World: Idea of the Future

1176 words - 5 pages Imagine a life of luxury and happiness. Sounds like a dream . . . but what if it was reality. Aldous Huxley's novel Brave New World explains how society turns into a dystopian future. He shows a world where humans are developed and controlled in means of stability. Aldous Huxley was raised in a family well-known for their intellectual and scientific achievements (Magill 952 -956). Therefore, he became a genius and even a prodigy for being...

Fulfilling the Prophecy of Brave New World

918 words - 4 pages Fulfilling the Prophecy of Brave New World   "Community, Identity, Stability" is the motto of the World State in the Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, a state intent on keeping itself intact. In the stable state, the people must be happy with the status quo; they must not be able to imagine a better world, and must not think of a worse one. In the stable state, a few people must be able to cope with unexpected change, but they...

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